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Ten proverbs every manager should follow

15

Feb 21

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A great manager is a person who knows how to treat people right and to help them unleash their potential in the workforce. Sadly, it is a very rare thing to discover a manager who is truly a great manager. Instead, there is an abundance of mediocre managers who, for whatever reason, feel it is their calling in life to make everyone miserable around them. If you happen to be a manager of people, here are a few time-tested proverbs and quotes that you should embrace. These ten proverbs that every manager should follow are just ten of many others, but these are a great start.

  1. The secret of getting ahead is getting started. Mark Twain
  2. Wise men speak because they have something to say. Fools because they have to say something. Plato
  3. Life’s most persistent and urgent question is “What are you doing for others?” Martin Luther King, Jr.
  4. Do all the good you can. By all the means you can. In all the ways you can. In all the places you can. At all the times you can. To all the people you can. As long as ever you can. John Wesley
  5. Think it. Don’t say it.
  6. Whatever you are, be a good one. Abraham Lincoln
  7. Everybody struggles with something. Give them a break.
  8. Have a can-do attitude. In more cases than not, it’s okay to use the phrase “Sure. Why not?”
  9. Be on time. Better to be an hour early than a minute late.
  10. The journey of a thousand miles begins with one step. Famous Chinese Proverb

If I were to suggest a great starting point from these ten maxims, I would recommend embracing Plato’s proverb: Wise men speak because they have something to say. Fools because they have to say something. Imagine a world where the fools around us kept their mouths shut a little more. Don’t be the type of person that needs to talk because you like the sound of your voice. Not only does it waste time, but it is a tell-tale sign of a narcissist at work.

Indeed, sometimes the best and most capable managers are those who are introverts rather than extroverts. This principle is wonderfully expounded upon the book Quiet, by Susan Cain. (It also goes into a little detail as to why open-concept offices are a terrible idea!) In my opinion, this is a must read for everyone.